Nearly all diabetic dogs and over 50% of diabetic cats rely on insulin given by their owners.

Diabetes mellitus is a fairly common cause of polyuria/polydipsia in cats and dogs. In nearly all diabetic dogs and over 50% of diabetic are dependent on insulin given by owners. In the other 30-50% of cats, the disease can be treated with diet, exercise, and oral medications. Either way, it remains a difficult disease to manage.

What causes it? Diabetes Mellitus (DM) results from a drop in the insulin levels in the body (or, in some cases, the body’s perception that insulin levels have dropped). Insulin is produced by the pancreas and, among other things, acts on the liver, muscles, and fat deposits to cause them to take glucose out of the blood and store it as glycogen or fat. If the ß cells in the pancreas stop making insulin – or receptors in tissues stop recognizing it – the glucose stays at high levels in the blood, can spill into the urine, and can create a multitude of health concerns that we associate with DM, including cataracts, glaucoma, urinary tract infections, weakness in hind legs, and life-threatening ketoacidosis. More